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The work of Morgan Riccilli Slade is at once mysterious and seductive. His large paintings engage viewers with rich visual storytelling.  Bold, bright colors layered and woven around seeming disparate images pop off the canvas.  Nostalgic silhouettes referencing childhood lend a sweet tone to otherwise satirical social messages.  At first benign, they innocently urge you closer until the narrative surfaces.  Slade’s works on paper and video balance a keen sense of history and photographic nostalgia while capturing a modern elegance and bold graphic style.

refine : refract is an ongoing series, based around multiple mediums, exploring the deconstruction and modification of a sign, and the reconstruction with a very purposeful re-presentation of image and concept. In the first installment, a series of 500 illustrations, digitally manipulated from a single source photograph, play in sequence beginning with a black frame, building up to a complete image, and slowly disintegrating to a black image again, exploring with a Baroque sensibility, the point where an image is complete, and the point where it begins to break down. The soundtrack consists of an abstracted version of ‘Claire de Lune’ by Debussy, again reconfigured from its original conception.

The new works on canvas take an approach that is more non objective and singular in that the image comes before the concept, and the final result is more about the graphic quality and its immediate impact. While the projects in the refine : refract series are generated over lengthy periods of time, the canvas pieces employ dry pigments and wet paint with the intent of creating a more physical process. Most of the design is prep work and final piece is made quickly, like a negative being burned into photo paper. The result is an image that appears to be simultaneously coming together as it is falling apart, as if it were only there to hold on for a moment.

Building Height is a new Works On Paper series. In this case, a lone silk screened image again explores the use of a subject taken out of its intended concept. In this version of the series, Victorian and Renaissance era wigs are displayed graphically, with no context other that the architectural aspects of their design.

Morgan Riccilli Slade studied Fine Art, Photography and Photographic Theory at the University of California at Santa Cruz. After graduating in 1991 he has exhibited work in San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Jose, Miami, and Sweden. He continues to work in multiple mediums in art and design and is the founder of RICCILLI.COM.

Morgan Riccilli Slade

 

 

 

 

www.morgansladestudio.com

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